06/05/2007

Lorna's Laces Stretchiness

Posted in Knitting at 3:53 pm by Jennie

Okay, for those of ya’ll who’ve worked with Lorna’s Laces Shepherd Sock, please provide some insight. After conversing with Janet about my LL Camo socks, I think I have some math issues. These socks are going to a male coworker of mine. I measured his foot circumferene and it was about 10 inches. I knit 9sts/inch on Us1 (2.25mm). I factored in 10% negative ease giving me 9 inches. Then multiply 9 x 9 = 81. This says I should cast on 80. But the socks look huge. LL is really stretchy compared to other yarns I’ve used, and I mean crazy stretchy. Janet suggested that I stretch the fabric and measure my stitch count. Well, this is a great idea! My stretched out measurement gave me 7sts/inch. So I would then multiply 7 x 10 = 70. Casting on 72sts would work out to be a better fit. Does this sound right? What are your thoughts?

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4 Comments »

  1. Trish said,

    I normally use a negative easy of 15 %, specially if they are going to be stockinette socks, so at a gauge of 9 spi, I would have cast on 76. 15% of 10″ foot circumference is 8.5″ so you multiply 8.5″x9 spi = cast on of 76.5 or 76 stitches since its impossible to cast on a half stitch. 🙂 I will also fudge with the numbers to make them fit depending on if I’m going to be knitting with DPs or ML so that I can use my standard 2×2 ribbing for the top of the cuff. Hope this helps you out. 🙂
    Also remember the sock is going to look huge to you since you have tiny feet. 😉

  2. Are you sure you measured it right? 10 inches seems really big (at least to me). My husband wears size 11 shoes and his foot circumference is 9″. Where did you measure? In any case, your math seems to be correct.

  3. Janet said,

    Jennie, I think you’ve gotten great insight here. I tend to rely on wool’s ability to stretch and cast on LESS stitches than I think I need rather than more. And I tend to prefer 72-stitch socks for the way the math works out on ribbing patterns (i.e. my preferred cuff ribbing is k2p2, but I also like k3p1 for a men’s sock – either one works and allows me to distribute my stitches evenly on 3 or 4 needles).

    I think it was in an Elizabeth Zimmermann book that I was reading her advice: in situations like this (knitting socks for others), use ribbing throughout! LOL

  4. Jenny said,

    Hey, Jennie. Thanks for stopping by my blog. 🙂 I just made my father some socks over 72 stitches, and I’ve made my boyfriend socks, also over 72 stitches. I use size 1 dpns. I have a tighter gauge than most folks. Hope this helps. By the by, I’ve never figured out gauge with socks, so I’m probably not the best advice-giver here, but I’ve never frogged a pair!


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